High Dynamic Range (HDR)

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High Dynamic Range photography, commonly known as HDR photography, is an effect meant to more-closely emulate the way we see the world; ours eyes can see a great range of light and dark at once with surprisingly detail, but a camera can only capture a small fraction of that brightness range. HDR photography combines multiple exposures (some too bright, some too dark) to create an image with detail in both the highlights and the shadows. Done properly, the effect can look just like real life. Some photographers choose to take it to the extreme and create some truly surreal images. On this page, you'll find a variety of links to get you started with HDR photography.

High Dynamic Range (HDR) Guides

Stuck in Customs | HDR Tutorial: Everything you need to know about HDR Photography

An in-depth HDR tutorial by the master of HDR, Trey Ratcliff, better known as StuckInCustoms. Not for beginners, this tutorial will take you step by step through RAW, Photomatix, and Photoshop to create amazing High Dynamic Range photographs.

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Vanilla Days | HDR Tutorial Guide Thing for Photomatix

This tutorial on VanillaDays.com is another great introduction to HDR photography, including true-HDR (with multiple exposures) and pseudo-HDR (with a single exposure). It's great for photographers wanting to start taking HDR photos.

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PhotoTuts+ | How to Shoot and Post-Process Professional HDR Photos in One Day

This article on PhotoTuts+ introduces the topic of HDR photography in question and answer form while walking you through the process, from shooting to editing.

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Cambridge in Colour | HDR: High Dynamic Range Photography

This guide walks you through the HDR process, specifically with Photoshop's built-in tone mapping. Photoshop's tone mapping isn't as easy as Photomatix's, so this tutorial is for advanced users. This page also explains the technicalities behind HDR photography a little more.

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